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Why are some people defined by their one or two flaws rather than there numerous positive abilities?

Is it because they are people that reveal their flaws and are open about them or is it because they don’t admit them?

One of my flaws for a long time has been (and still is) finishing things I started. 

How did I start overcoming this flaw?  Here is how I started to overcome it:

  1. I first asked people what my flaws were.  They told me them and this was the one that kept coming up. 
  2. I realized my flaw.  Came to grips with it and started putting systems in place to overcome it.
  3. Looked at the root of my flaw.  The root of my flaw was that I didn’t particularly find joy in finishing things.  So what did I do?  I started to enjoy putting the final detailed touches on a project.  Whether it was sweeping off sidewalks or following through on a project that I was finishing. 
  4. Celebrated times I overcame them.  When I realized at times of conquering my flaw I celebrated and thought about them for awhile.  I enjoyed them and realized the value in conquering them.
  5. Made lists and lists.   I made lists of what I needed to do.  I made to-do lists daily.  I made lists of projects for the future when I thought of things, and I put reminders in place so I didn’t forget.

 

Do you know what your flaws are? 

Are you willing to put the work into minimizing or eliminating it? 

If you have eliminated it how have you done it?

I know the title of the blog is learn and lead.  So here is something I have learned about leading lately. 

I just finished the book Sense of Urgency by John Kotter.  I recommend this book to anyone who is looking to create some urgency around them and in themselves.  It is a pretty quick read and has many good points.

On most of my books I have done outlines so I can look at them later.  I will probably do an outline later but for now I need to take a few things that I can take away from this book to help me improve and lead now.

I have read lately that out of each book you should have two or three things to take from each book.  If you have more than that you will not be able to do them all.

These are the 2 main things I learned from John Kotter’s Book Sense of Urgency:

1.  True Urgency starts with YOU having a sense of urgency EVERY DAY!  Not most days, not mornings or afternoons.  EVERY DAY.  If you want others to have any urgency you need to have true urgency everyday.  What is true urgency?  It is not being busy like everyone thinks.  True urgency is making sure that you are working on your main priorities every day.  You need to focus on what your 3-5 biggest priorities every day and do them.

2. You need to spend 1 hour each day being seen and being around your team.  I can be awful at this.  I try to work on all what seems like “urgent” projects.  But the people around you deserve more urgency than some of your tasks.  People need to see you doing things around them.  Not just locked up in an office somewhere.  Spend an hour each day investing in people at work.

 

We will see how these go.  I love that I have 2 goals for the next couple of weeks. I will fill you in with how I am doing.

This thought came to me as I was reading an article by Kevin Eikenberry at Remarkable Leadership about Daylight Savings Time.

In the article he talked about how in Central Indiana they finally changed to daylight savings time.  Also he talked about if there are certain triggers that remind you to take care of certain “mundane” tasks.

We are such creatures of habit in what we do.  We would rather have the same predictable problems than change and have the possibility of a new set of problems. 

How do you as a leader balance creating the new horizons with balancing the mundane to get things done?

  • Start with a plan:  Mark out where you want to go.
  • Automate the basics for review: Set aside certain chunks of time on a monthly basis to go over the basics every month.  Whether it be marketing, sales, or something else.
  • Write Down Ideas as you Go: Make sure you have a place to keep track of all the things you think of.
  • Take a Day:  Take a day to go through all your ideas and reflect on the last while.  Do this no less than 3 times a year.
  • Debrief every night: Go through what happened each day in your mind and learn from it so you can develop for the future.

This short list is things I am trying but you need to take the time!

When you are a small company it is easy to keep things personal.  It is easy to know everyone by name.  It is even easy to have your thumb on the culture and to know everyone around you. 

You build your advantages by:

  • Being able to know everyone more personally.
  • Getting things done faster than anyone else.
  • Doing things not as many others would do.

But as you grow larger you lose some of those things that made you great.  How do you roll with the punches and still be exceptional in what you do?

As you get larger you need to specialize and everyone can’t do everything.  People get stuck doing things longer than they are used to and find their job less enjoyable.  It is your job to keep their focus ahead instead of behind. 

But as you expand and become bigger, if that is what you need to do, there is tradeoffs.  You can grow as big as you can or you can try maximize what you have. 

As a leader you need to be able to cast the vision of what is important.  You need to communicate continually about what you are about as a company.  You need to encourage everyone.

As you get larger everyone starts to wish they had the small closeness back in your business.  But most of the time they have a glorified view of the past.  That was one of the positives and most of the negatives have already been forgotten. 

As you move forward point out the positives about expanding.  (One of them should be survival and providing jobs for everyone.)  It is amazing how once change happens everyone wants to revert to how things used to be.   And how things used to be is way more glamorized than it actually was.

Another great article on this is by Paul Williams at Marketing Profs Daily Fix.